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Cancer Vaccines Ready Within Three Years – Russian Scientist

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Most remaining obstacles appear to be regulatory, according to Vasily Lazarev of Russia’s Federal Medical-Biological Agency

Russian medical researchers could be able to roll out oncological vaccines within the next couple of years, given adequate funding and support from lawmakers, a high-ranking official at the Federal Medical-Biological Agency (FMBA) said on Thursday.

The comments come after President Vladimir Putin said last month that the country was “one step away” from developing vaccines against cancer.

“If financial support is provided, I think that in two or three years existing organizations will be able to put oncology vaccines into practice,” Vasily Lazarev, deputy director of the Lopukhin Federal Scientific and Clinical Center for Physical and Chemical Medicine, told the outlet RTVI.

Domestic private investors will also be attracted to the technology “after regulatory pressure eases,” he added.

Lazarev did not bring up any medical or technological challenges, choosing instead to highlight the legal constraints facing vaccine development. 

“I don’t know how quickly by-laws will be developed, it could take a year to resolve all the regulatory issues,” he said. “We have the tools, the production facilities, I think it’s not difficult to organize.”

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Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a plenary session of the Future Technologies Forum at Moscow's World Trade Centre in Moscow, Russia.
Russia close to ‘cancer vaccines’ – Putin

Amendments proposed by the FMBA, which would allow for the production and use of “variable composition” medication, will go into effect in September. They also require the drugs to be produced at the same institution that holds the patent, however.

“Organizing such production at home will be quite expensive, although it is feasible,” Lazarev said. “Most likely, these will be regional centers and maybe specialized oncological institutions.”

There are currently only a handful of facilities that could handle the production requirements, such as the Blokhin Cancer Center or the FMBA’s Federal Center for Brain and Neurotechnology, both located in Moscow.

Variable-composition neoantigens, which vaccine developers have focused on, don’t quite fit the current Russian legal framework and could not be used in treatments at all until very recently.

Putin revealed the development of cancer vaccines at the Future Technologies Forum in Moscow last month. The Russian president mentioned them among the developing medical technologies that he described as approaching science fiction.

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Victims of Domestic Violence Rally Against Proposed Joint Custody Laws in Japan, Citing Legal System Flaws

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In Japan, the debate over joint custody laws reveals deep societal concerns about family violence and its impact on victims. Critics argue the proposed joint custody laws could endanger victims by inadvertently reconnecting them with abusive ex-partners. Demonstrations have taken place, with advocates arguing that the system lacks effective measures to protect those affected by family violence.

Women, disproportionately impacted, represent a higher percentage of abuse reports. Allegations of physical abuse backed by photographic evidence and medical reports have been dismissed by the courts, leaving victims feeling helpless and ignored. On the other hand, parents deprived of their children’s presence argue the legal system fails to address their grievances or consider the emotional harm inflicted on both children and parents.

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Electricians’ Union Raises Alarm Over Unsafe Practices in Solar Industry

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In Australia, safety and employment conditions in the solar farm industry are raising concerns. There have been reports of unqualified workers, including backpackers on working holiday visas, doing electrical tasks that legally require licensed electricians. The electrical trades union has pointed out cases where trade assistants without proper qualifications or supervision performed risky electrical work.

Incidents include workers installing solar panels in water, posing a risk of electrocution. Poor working conditions have led to dissatisfaction among electricians, who feel their safety concerns and expertise are being ignored. The industry is currently facing a significant demand for electricians due to the rapid expansion of solar farm constructions, with 34 projects underway. The union is urging the renewable energy sector to invest in training a new generation of electricians to meet this demand.

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Tesla Faces Backlash from Cybertruck Owners Citing Multiple Performance Flaws

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